Archives 2002
Issue No. 28
Issue No. 29
Issue No. 30
Issue No. 31
Issue No. 32
Issue No. 33
Issue No. 34
Issue No. 35
Issue No. 36
Issue No. 37
Issue No. 38
Issue No. 39
Issue No. 40
Issue No. 41
Issue No. 42
Issue No. 43
Issue No. 44
Issue No. 45
Issue No. 46
Issue No. 47
Issue No. 48
Issue No. 49
Issue No. 50
Issue No. 51
Issue No. 52
Issue No. 53
Issue No. 54
Issue No. 55
Issue No. 56
Issue No. 57
Issue No. 58
Issue No. 59
Issue No. 60
Issue No. 61
Issue No. 62
Issue No. 63
Issue No. 64
Issue No. 65
Issue No. 66
Issue No. 67
Issue No. 68
Issue No. 69
Issue No. 70
Issue No. 71
Issue No. 72
Issue No. 73
Issue No. 74
Issue No. 75
Issue No. 76
Issue No. 77
Issue No. 78
Issue No. 79

  Log In

 

March 31, 2002

                             ET News
================================================================
                NEWS FOR ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS
----------------------------------------------------------------
Volume 2 Issue 13                                      3-31-2002
================================================================

Contents
--------
- News
- ET Journal
- Test Dates
- Class Schedule
- Administrivia

=================================================================
NEWS
=================================================================

Towers Withstood Impact, but Fell to Fire, Report Says
By JAMES GLANZ and ERIC LIPTON The New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/29/nyregion/29TOWE.html?pagewanted=all

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Participate in the AFAA discussion list by sending an email message to
mailto:firealarm-subscribe@egroups.com. While everyone is encouraged to
participate, lurkers like me enjoy reading the repartee of fire alarm
industry AHJs, engineers, technicians, and manufacturers.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

I received a flyer in the mail recently regarding from what appears to
be a new organization called NCFTA, which stands for NICET Certified
Fire Technicians Association. They have a web site ->
http://www.firecertified.org.

=================================================================
ET JOURNAL
=================================================================

NICET Fire Alarm Systems Level I
32003^ BASIC PHYSICAL SCIENCE
-------------------------------------------

32003 DESCRIPTION:
Apply terms, definitions, and concepts from mechanics, electricity,
heat, and chemistry. (Solutions may involve simple formulas found in
basic physics textbooks, but will not involve algebraic manipulations or
trigonometry)

32003 is a Level I Special Work element.

The caret (^) following 32003 means generic crossover credit. Once you
pass this exam element, you will receive credit in other
fields/subfields when you first test in the other field/subfield.

32003 REFERENCES:
Solutions may involve simple formulas found in basic physics textbooks,
but will not involve algebraic manipulations or trigonometry.

32003 DESCRIPTION BREAKDOWN:
"Apply terms, definitions, and concepts from mechanics,...
Newton's Three Laws of Motion
1) An object at rest or moving at constant velocity will continue to do
so unless acted upon by an outside force.
2) Force on an object equals mass times acceleration F=MA.
3) For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

The weight of an object on earth equals the force of attraction between
the earth and the object. Weight equals mass times the acceleration due
to gravity.

Acceleration due to earth's gravity at sea level is 9.8 m/s^2

Work done equals force (Newtons) exerted times distance traveled
(Meters). The result is Newton-Meters, or Joules.
Power equals change in work done (Joules) over time (seconds). The
result is Joules/second or Watts.

"Apply terms, definitions, and concepts from electricity,...
The five basic units of electricity:
[q] Charge expressed in Coulombs (C)
[V] Voltage, expressed in Volts (V)
[I] Current expressed in Amperes (A)
[R] Resistance expressed in Ohms (Greek letter omega)
[P] Power expressed in Watts (W)

Charge (q) = Coulombs q=NE. Charges are the basis of electricity. A
charge exerts forces on other charges. The smallest charge is the charge
of an electron, 0.000000000000000016 Coulombs. The magnitude of the
charge q = the number of electrons times the charge of one electron.

Voltage (V) = joules/Coulomb V=E/q. Voltage is an energy measure, the
energy carried by one coulomb of electrical charge. The voltage between
two points in a circuit is the amount of energy available for pushing
each coulomb of charge from one of these points to the other.

Current (I) = Coulomb/second. Current is the rate of flow of electrical
charge.

Resistance (R). The characteristic of materials to oppose the flow of
electricity in an electric circuit.

Power (P) = I x V. Power is the rate of working. When power is
transmitted electrically, the amount is the product of voltage (V) with
current (I).

Ohm's Law
V = I x R
I = V / R
R = V / I

Power Law
P = I x V
I = P / V
V = P / I


"Apply terms, definitions, and concepts from heat,...
Heat is a form of energy that results from the movement of atoms or
molecules in a solid, liquid, or gas. Heat can be transferred in three
ways:

1) CONVECTION is the transfer of heat by the actual movement of the
warmed matter. Heat leaves the coffee cup as the currents of steam and
air rise. Convection is the transfer of heat energy in a gas or liquid
by movement of currents. Think of air and water currents! (It can also
happen is some solids, like sand.) The heat moves with the fluid.
Consider this: convection is responsible for making macaroni rise and
fall in a pot of heated water. The warmer portions of the water are less
dense and therefore, they rise. Meanwhile, the cooler portions of the
water fall because they are denser.

2) CONDUCTION is the transfer of energy through matter from particle to
particle. It is the transfer and distribution of heat energy from atom
to atom within a substance. For example, a spoon in a cup of hot soup
becomes warmer because the heat from the soup is conducted along the
spoon. Conduction is most effective in solids-but it can happen in
fluids. Fun fact: Have you ever noticed that metals tend to feel cold?
Believe it or not, they are not colder! They only feel colder because
they conduct heat away from your hand. You perceive the heat that is
leaving your hand as cold.

3) RADIATION - Electromagnetic waves that directly transport ENERGY
through space. Sunlight is a form of radiation that is radiated through
space to our planet at the speed of light without the aid of fluids or
solids. The energy travels through nothingness! Just think of it! The
sun transfers heat through 93 million miles of space. Because there are
no solids (like a huge spoon) touching the sun and our planet,
conduction is not responsible for bringing heat to Earth. Since there
are no fluids (like air and water) in space, convection is not
responsible for transferring the heat. Thus, radiation brings heat to
our planet.

Source:
http://www.mansfieldct.org/schools/mms/staff/hand/convcondrad.htm

calorie: The heat energy needed to raise 1 gm of water 1 degree Celsius.
1 calorie is equal to 4.186 Joules. 
Calorie: A common unit to measure the energy content of food, with 1
Calorie = 1000 calories.
BTU: British Thermal Unit, still used as a rating on some furnaces, and
is the heat energy needed to raise 1 pound of water 1 degree Fahrenheit.
1 BTU = 252 calories = 1,054 Joules.

A calorimeter is an instrument for measuring heat or such thermal
constants as the specific heat of a substance.


"Apply terms, definitions, and concepts from chemistry."
Fire, heat and light result from the rapid combination of oxygen, or in
some cases gaseous chlorine, with other materials. The light is in the
form of flame, which is composed of glowing particles of the burning
material and certain gaseous products that are luminous at the
temperature of the burning material. The conditions necessary for the
existence of fire are the presence of a combustible substance, a
temperature high enough to cause combustion (called the ignition
temperature) and the presence of enough oxygen (usually provided by the
air) or chlorine to enable rapid combustion to continue.

Combustion is a process of rapid oxidation or burning of a substance
with simultaneous evolution of heat and, usually, light. In the case of
common fuels, the process is one of chemical combination with
atmospheric oxygen to produce as the principal products carbon dioxide,
carbon monoxide, and water, together with products such as sulfur
dioxide that may be generated by the minor constituents of the fuel (see
chemical reaction). The term combustion, however, also embraces
oxidation in the broad chemical sense, and the oxidizing agent may be
nitric acid, certain perchlorates, or even chlorine or fluorine.

Source: http://www.iversonsoftware.com/reference/chemistry/c/c.html

Transitions from one solid to another solid form, from solid to liquid,
from liquid to vapor, from vapor to solid etc. are called phase
transitions.

Phase transitions from solid to liquid, and from liquid to vapor absorb
heat. The temperature of a system usually does not change as long as two
phases are present. The (phase) transition temperature from solid to
liquid is called the melting point whereas the temperature at which the
vapor pressure of a liquid equals 1 atm (101.3 kPa) is called the
boiling point.

A substance expands on heating. For a rod, the lengthening of a unit
length per degree Kelvin is the linear thermal expansion coefficient.

The amount of energy required to raise the temperature of a substance by
1 degree Kelvin is the heat capacity. If the substance has a unit mass,
the amount is referred to as specific heat capacity, or specific heat.

Source:
http://www.science.uwaterloo.ca/~cchieh/cact/applychem/propertyp.html


THE INFORMATION IN ET JOURNAL IS PROVIDED AS A GUIDE ONLY AND IS
INTENDED TO ASSIST YOU IN PREPARING FOR AN EXAM. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO
BE INCLUSIVE OF ALL INFORMATION THAT MAY BE ON AN EXAM BUT RATHER IT IS
INTENDED TO BE A SMALL SAMPLE OF THE KIND OF MATERIAL THAT YOU MAY BE
EXPECTED TO KNOW.

================================================================
NICET TEST DATES
================================================================

OREGON
------
PCC Sylvania, Portland;
Test 4/20/02. Postmark deadline 3/2/02.
Test 7/27/02. Postmark deadline 6/8/02.

Clackamas Community College, Oregon City;
Test 6/22/02. Postmark deadline 5/4/02.
Test 9/14/02. Postmark deadline 7/27/02.

WASHINGTON
----------
Bates Technical College, Tacoma;
Test 5/18/02. Postmark deadline 3/30/02.
Test 9/14/02. Postmark deadline 7/27/01.

Walla Walla Community College;
Test 4/20/02. Postmark deadline 3/2/02.
Test 7/27/02. Postmark deadline 6/8/02.

Spokane Community College;
Test 5/18/02. Postmark deadline 3/30/02.
Test 8/24/02. Postmark deadline 7/6/01.

For a complete list of all test centers and test dates, visit
http://63.70.211.210/cfdocs/nicetschedule.cfm

================================================================
CLASS SCHEDULE 
================================================================

OREGON
------
Clackamas Community College is sponsoring a 16-hour NICET Test
Preparation Seminar:

>> 4-6-2002 8am - 5pm NICET Certification application process and Fire
Alarm Systems Level I Element Review.

>> 4-13-2002 8am - 5pm Fire Alarm Systems Level II Element Review.

OUTLINE
-------
http://65.108.49.140/docs/outline.pdf

LOCATION
--------
Clackamas Community College
http://www.clackamas.cc.or.us/maps/campus/

INSTRUCTOR
----------
Michael B. Baker SET
(503) 209-7345
mailto:mbbaker@etnews.org?subject=seminar_info

----------------------------------------------------------------

WASHINGTON
----------
Dean Reed and Associates is sponsoring a 16-hour NICET(r) Test
Preparation Seminar:

>> 4-20-02 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. NICET Certification application process and
Fire Alarm Systems Level I Element Review.

>> 4-27-02 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fire Alarm Systems Level II Element Review.

CONTACT
-------
Dean Reed
(206) 953-8240 or 206-935-8950
mailto:bubba@oz.net

LOCATION
--------
Pinkerton Systems Integration
15404 53rd Ave South
Seattle, WA 98188
[Near South Center]

INSTRUCTOR
----------
Dean Reed CET
(206) 935-8950
mailto:bubba@oz.net

================================================================
ADMINISTRIVIA
================================================================

The ET Newsletter is also available on the web http://etnews.org

ET News PHP/MySQL site by Doug Hockinson  http://metrodenver.org

Subscribe to ET News mailto:mbbaker@etnews.org?subject=subscribe

Unsubscribe here:  mailto:mbbaker@etnews.org?subject=unsubscribe

Send your comments to mailto:mbbaker@etnews.org?subject=comments

Step-by-Step guide to NICET Certification in Fire Alarm Systems
http://www.etnews.org/docs/stepbystep.pdf  [requires Acrobat Reader]

================================================================
The acronym NICET belongs to:
National Institute for Certification in Engineering Technologies
1420 King Street || Alexandria, VA 22314-2794  || (888) 476-4238
----------------------------------------------------------------
ET News Copyright(c) 2002 by Michael B Baker all rights reserved
Send a link to a friend        
 

 

Home - Clients - Book Store - NICET Level I - NICET Level II - NICET Level III - NICET Level IV - Glossary - External Links - Licensing - Photographs - Employment - Disney Crud(SM) - Archives 2001 - Archives 2002 - Archives 2003 - Archives 2004 - Archives 2005 - Archives 2006 - Archives 2007 - Archives 2008 - Archives 2009 - Archives 2010 - Archives 2011 - Archives 2012 - Archives 2013 - Misc

ET NewsSM content copyright © 2017
by Michael B. Baker. All rights reserved.
ISSN 1554-074X

RSS Content
Some information may be found within this web site that is reprinted with permission from one or more of the following: NFPA 70 National Electrical Code®,NFPA 72® National Fire Alarm Code®, & NFPA 101® Life Safety Code®, Copyright© NFPA, Quincy, MA 02269.

This reprinted material is not the complete and official position of the NFPA on the referenced subject, which is represented only by the standard in its entirety.