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March 10, 2002

                             ET News
=================================================================
                NEWS FOR ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Volume 2 Issue 10                                      3-10-2002
=================================================================

Contents
--------
- News
- ET Journal
- Test Dates
- Class Schedule
- Administrivia

==================================================================
NEWS
==================================================================

Don't miss the next general membership meeting of the Oregon Automatic
Fire Alarm Association http://oafaa.org to be held at 9 a.m. on April 16
at Marion County Fire District #1 Training Center located at 4910
Brooklake Rd. NE, Brooks, OR 97305.

Map ->
http://maps.yahoo.com/py/maps.py?Pyt=Tmap&addr=4910+Brooklake+Rd+Ne+Broo
ks+%7C+&csz=97305&Get%A0Map=Get+Map

For more information, contact the OAFAA President, Larry Tate
mailto:larry@nwfire.com.

==================================================================
ET JOURNAL
==================================================================

NICET* Fire Alarm Systems Level I
31010^ BASIC COMMUNICATION SKILLS
---------------------------------

31010 DESCRIPTION
Use proper punctuation, vocabulary, spelling, and sentence structure.
Follow written instructions. (See basic grammar references)

31010 is a General Non-Core Work element.

The caret (^) following 31010 means generic crossover credit. Once you
pass this exam element, you will receive credit in other
fields/subfields when you first test in the other field/subfield.

31010 REFERENCES:
See basic grammar references

31010 DESCRIPTION BREAKDOWN:
"Use proper punctuation,...

Apostrophe'
----------
1 To show omission
-It's been raining all week! [It's = It has]
-I'm ready to move away from the rain! [I'm = I am]

2 To show possession
-We went to Jake's restaurant. [The restaurant belongs to Jake]
-We ate in the lions' den. [more than one lion]

If there's one owner - add an apostrophe and then 's'.
If there are two or more owners - add 's' then an apostrophe. 

There are some exceptions to this rule.

Source: http://www.users.bigpond.com/J_fersOffice/sample.htm

Colon:
------
1. After an independent clause that precedes a list. 
-The use of these punctuation marks often confuses students: comma,
semicolon, colon, hyphen, and dash. 
-There are three historical sources of belief: reason or intellect,
custom or habit, and inspiration. 

2. To separate an explanation, rule, or example from a preceding
independent clause.
-After a sleepless night, the senator made his decision: he would not
seek re-election.
-A way to remember which direction to move the hands of the clock when
changing to or from Daylight Savings Time: spring forward, fall back.

3. After the salutation of a business letter.
-Dear Mr. Peterson:
-Dear Faculty Member:

4. In the heading of a business memo.
-TO:
-SUBJECT:

5. Between the hour and the minutes.
-5:30 p.m.
-3:00 a.m.

6. Between the chapter and the verse in the Bible, in citations for some
literary works, and between the volume and the number of some
publications.
-Genesis 1:18-20
-Part 3:121
-Vol. 2:34

7.As part of a title.
-Grey Power: A Practical Survival Handbook for Senior Citizens.

8. In a bibliography between the place of publication and the name of
the publisher.
-Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1966.

Source: http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/punct/col-semi.html

Comma,
------
1. Use commas to separate a series of three or more items:
-The assignment requires us to think, write, and speak.
-Sarah went outdoors, Bill and John went downstairs, and I went on
vacation.

2. Use commas between independent clauses when joined by these
transition words: and, nor, for, or, yet, so, but.
-We shape our tools, and our tools shape us.
-I like computer science, but I love literature.

3. Use a comma after a word or group of words that comes before an
independent clause.
-If that's their idea of a large pizza, we'd better order two.
-Frankly, I don't really care.

4. Use commas around words, phrases, or clauses that aren't essential to
the sentence's meaning. If they can be taken out of the sentence without
altering its meaning, they're usually non-essential words.
-The janitor, a tall man, lifted the cat out of the tree.
-The table, with legs half broken, sat somewhat sadly at the far end of
the room.

Source: http://www.sdc.uwo.ca/writing/owlhandout/comma_use.html

Dash-
-----
Often typed as two hyphens side by side with no space between the dash
and the words on either side of it.

1. Separating Words in the Middle of the Sentence.
-Linda Simpson-the president's most trusted economic advisor-will resign
her office during today's press conference.
-Simpson's prescription for the economy-lower interest rates, higher
employment, and less government spending-was rejected by the president's
administration.

2. Adding Words to the End of a Sentence.
-The president will be unable to win enough votes for another term of
office-unless, of course, he can reduce unemployment and the deficit
simultaneously.
-Generally, the president's economic policies have proven
ineffective-although, it's true that he has lowered inflation
considerably.

Source: http://chuma.cas.usf.edu/~olson/pms/dash.html

Exclamation Point!
------------------
DO use an exclamation point to convey a strong emotion.
-Advertising is not dead!

DO NOT use more than one exclamation point.

Source: http://advertising.utexas.edu/research/style/#Exc

Hyphen-
-------
1. To make clear the unifying of the sense in compound expressions such
as punch-drunk, cost-benefit analysis, or weight-carrying, or compounds
in attributive use (that is, in front of the noun), as in an up-to-date
list or the well-known performer.

2. To join a prefix to a proper name (e.g. anti-Darwinian).

3. To avoid misunderstanding by distinguishing phrases such as
twenty-odd people and twenty odd people, or a third-world conflict and a
third world conflict.

4. To clarify the use of a prefix, as in recovering from an illness and
re-covering an umbrella.

5. To clarify compounds with similar adjacent sounds, such as
sword-dance, co-opt, tool-like.

6. to represent the use of a common element in a list of compounds, such
as four-, six-, and eight-legged animals.

7. In dividing a word across a line-break.

Source: http://www.askoxford.com/asktheexperts/faq/aboutspelling/hyphen

Period.
-------
1. Use a period to show the end of a sentence.
-Hockey is a popular sport in Canada.
-The federal government is based in Ottawa.

2. Use a period after certain abbreviations.
-B.C. is the province located on the West Coast.
-Dr. Bethune was a Canadian who worked in China.
-The company is located at 888 Bay St. in Toronto.
-It is 4:00 p.m. in Halifax right now.

Source: http://www2.actden.com/writ_den/tips/sentence/puctuate.htm

Question mark?
--------------
Use a question mark at the end of a sentence that asks a question.

Example: Do you believe in vampires?

Remember that when punctuating a sentence, the main verb determines
whether you should use a period or question mark. For instance, if you
tell me that you asked your friend a question, you are making a
statement:

Example: I asked her why on earth she had dropped that course.

NOT: I asked her why on earth she had dropped that course?

If the same sentence was re-written in dialogue form, your question to
your friend would end with a question mark:

Example: I asked her, "Why on earth did you drop that course?"

Misusing the Question Mark

Do not use a question mark to indicate your doubt about a choice of
word, or to indicate that you are dubious about a particular statement.

Incorrect: This was the most inspiring (?) book I have ever read.

Source:
http://www.ucalgary.ca/UofC/eduweb/grammar/course/punctuation/3_1.htm 

Quotation mark"
---------------
1. Commas and periods always go inside the quotation marks.
-I know you are fond of the story "Children of the Corn," but is it an
appropriate subject for your essay?
-"At last," said the old woman, "I can say I am truly happy."

2. Semicolons and colons always go outside the quotation marks.
-She never liked the poem "Dover Beach"; in fact, it was her least
favourite piece of Victorian literature.
-He clearly states his opinion in the article "Of Human Bondage": he
believes that television has enslaved and diminished an entire
generation.

3. Question marks, exclamation marks, and dashes go inside quotation
marks when they are part of the quotation, and outside when they do not.
-Where is your copy of "The Raven"?
-"How cold is it outside?" my mother asked.

Note that in North American usage, you should use single quotation marks
(') only to set off quoted material (or a minor title) inside a
quotation.

-"I think she said 'I will try,' not 'I won't try,'" explained Sandy.

Source:
http://www.uottawa.ca/academic/arts/writcent/hypergrammar/qmarks.html

Semicolon;
----------
1. To join independent clauses in compound sentences that do not have
coordinating conjunctions (and, or, but, nor, for, so, yet) and commas
as connectors. Words like "however," "moreover," "thus," and
"therefore," are often used as connectors in these sentences.
-There was no running and no shouting; all the children behaved very
well; therefore, they will all get a treat.
-Working mothers nationally pay an average of $53 a week for child care;
this means that many women pay nearly half of their weekly salary to day
care centers or babysitters.

2. To separate long or complicated items in a series which already
includes commas.
-The speakers were Dr. Judith Cornwell, English; Dr. Peter Mortrude,
biology; Dr. Shirley Enders, history; and Dr. Charles Viceroy,
mathematics.
-I have recommended this student because she communicates well with
other students, faculty, and staff; completes her assignments ably and
on time; and demonstrates an ability to organize people, materials, and
time.

3. To separate two long or complex independent clauses joined by a
coordinating conjunction if confusion would result from using a comma.
-Ishmael, the narrator in Moby-Dick goes to sea, he says, "whenever it
is a damp, drizzly November" in his heart and soul; but Ahab, the
captain of the ship, goes to sea because of his obsession to hunt and
kill the great white whale, Moby Dick.
-By the end of the sessions, the participants will have learned how to
handle excessive amounts of paperwork, to work under pressure, and to
juggle deadlines; and, if they complete all requirements, they will have
a valuable addition to their resumes.

Source: http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/punct/col-semi.html

"...vocabulary,
Use a dictionary, regularly.

"...spelling,
See "vocabulary".

"...and sentence structure.
To form a sentence, you need a subject and a verb. If you've got both of
these, you've got yourself a sentence, whether it's as simple as "Robert
spoke" or as compound-complex as "After the baseball game, before the
family made the trek to the station wagon, little Gertrude managed to
consume six cotton candies, two popcorns, a Jumbo Coke, and innumerable
Raisinettes; she also ate several souvenir pennants, much to the
surprise of the souvenir salesbooth attendant."

Source: http://web.odu.edu/al/writing_tutorial_serv/sentstru.htm

"Follow written instructions."
A train leaves Chicago heading North and arrives 2 hours later at
Kenosha. What was the train's average speed in furlongs per fortnight?

More examples: http://www.etnews.org/docs/nrat.pdf

THE INFORMATION IN ET JOURNAL IS PROVIDED AS A GUIDE ONLY AND IS
INTENDED TO ASSIST YOU IN PREPARING FOR AN EXAM. THE MATERIAL HEREIN IS
NOT INTENDED TO BE INCLUSIVE OF ALL INFORMATION THAT MAY BE ON AN EXAM.

=================================================================
NICET* TEST DATES
=================================================================

OREGON
------
PCC Sylvania, Portland;
Test 4/20/02. Postmark deadline 3/2/02.
Test 7/27/02. Postmark deadline 6/8/02.

Clackamas Community College, Oregon City;
Test 6/22/02. Postmark deadline 5/4/02.
Test 9/14/02. Postmark deadline 7/27/02.

WASHINGTON
----------
Bates Technical College, Tacoma;
Test 5/18/02. Postmark deadline 3/30/02.
Test 9/14/02. Postmark deadline 7/27/01.

Walla Walla Community College;
Test 4/20/02. Postmark deadline 3/2/02.
Test 7/27/02. Postmark deadline 6/8/02.

Spokane Community College;
Test 5/18/02. Postmark deadline 3/30/02.
Test 8/24/02. Postmark deadline 7/6/01.

For a complete list of all test centers and test dates, visit
http://63.70.211.210/cfdocs/nicetschedule.cfm

=================================================================
CLASS SCHEDULE 
=================================================================

OREGON
------
Clackamas Community College is sponsoring a 16-hour NICET* Test
Preparation Seminar:

>> 4-6-2002 8am - 5pm NICET* Certification application process and Fire
Alarm Systems Level I Element Review.

>> 4-13-2002 8am - 5pm Fire Alarm Systems Level II Element Review.

OUTLINE
-------
http://65.108.49.140/docs/outline.pdf

LOCATION
--------
Clackamas Community College
http://www.clackamas.cc.or.us/maps/campus/

INSTRUCTOR
----------
Michael B. Baker, SET
(503) 209-7345
mailto:mbbaker@etnews.org?subject=seminar_info

-----------------------------------------------------------------

WASHINGTON
----------
The Washington Burglar & Fire Alarm Association (WBFAA) is sponsoring
two 16-hour CEU seminars:

FIRE ALARM INSTALLATION METHODS:

>> 3-18-2002 8am - 5pm

>> 3-19-2002 8am - 5pm

LIFE SAFETY CODE COURSE & WORKSHOP

>> 3-20-2002 8am - 5pm

>> 3-21-2002 8am - 5pm

CONTACT
-------
Stella McDonald, WBFAA Executive Director
(800) 248-9272
mailto:smspokane@sisna.com

LOCATION
--------
Honeywell
9555 SE 36th Street
Mercer Island, WA 98040
http://maps.yahoo.com/py/maps.py?Pyt=Tmap&addr=9555+Se+36th+Street+&csz=
Mercer+Island+WA+&Get%A0Map=Get+Map

INSTRUCTOR
----------
Robert Sturken

=================================================================
ADMINISTRIVIA
=================================================================

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